From the Economist Oct 26 issue 2013

From the Economist Oct 26 issue 2013

A funny joke I heard on an audiobook regarding John Maynard Keynes.

If you put two economists in one room to discuss a problem, you’ll get two opinions, unless one of them is Lord Keynes in which case you’ll get three.

My source: Keynes Hayek

So apparently we have mechanical flies now that can potentially be used for military operations or search and rescue operations. They’re cool looking for re-enacting the Wizard of Oz on a smaller scale. 

My favorite part is at the end where libertarians get mad. “Gold, having no yield or earnings, is hard to value. That was a help when the price was rising, since the sky seemed to be the limit. But now that the metal is falling, the lack of valuation support is a curse. Like the government-backed paper money that gold bugs despise, gold is precious only so long as enough people agree that it is.”

Here’s a sweet gem of a quote

Now the pull of low-wage countries is weakening. In a survey of big American manufacturers by the Boston Consulting Group last spring, nearly two-fifths of firms said they were either planning to move or thinking about moving production facilities from China back home. Next month America will start making mass-market personal computers again when Lenovo, a Chinese giant, relaunches production of IBM ThinkPad notebooks and desktop PCs in North Carolina. Foxconn, a Taiwanese firm which makes a large share of the world’s electronic gadgets, now says it will expand in America. General Motors plans to shift almost all its IT (much of which had also gone to India) back home to Detroit. These days the main reason why companies want to expand their presence overseas is to be close to consumers in fast-growing new markets, not to exploit low wages as part of an offshoring strategy.

Similar to the last link I posted, this article has taken a cool look at how the emerging middle class in the east will shape consumption and the world economy.

This is fascinating.
I read about the Japanese nuclear protests in The Economist magazine a lot, but I rarely see it on television… but then again I rarely watch television!
These people are saying NO! to nuclear power, but I have no idea what else they would use. Nuclear power is the best source for that country considering how little space it takes, the efficiency of it, and how bad the alternatives are.
Oil would result in paying for it from foreign countries, or somehow finding oil in the Pacific ocean’s floor. Japan has already been importing more oil/coal/gas than ever before due to the shutting down of their nuclear facilities, and they are running a huge trade deficit because of it. 
Wind & solar power would require vast areas of open land, while Japan is but a tiny island already crowded with a lot of people. The furthest this can go is putting solar panels on rooftops, and hoping to break even and then profit after 10-15 years of use. 
Nuclear is a clear winner for energy efficiency, but the people of Japan would rather not repeat the nuclear disaster. I just hope the Japanese know that they will be sacrificing a lot of wealth for this security, and even then, nobody can run away from global warming and air pollution. 

This is fascinating.

I read about the Japanese nuclear protests in The Economist magazine a lot, but I rarely see it on television… but then again I rarely watch television!

These people are saying NO! to nuclear power, but I have no idea what else they would use. Nuclear power is the best source for that country considering how little space it takes, the efficiency of it, and how bad the alternatives are.

Oil would result in paying for it from foreign countries, or somehow finding oil in the Pacific ocean’s floor. Japan has already been importing more oil/coal/gas than ever before due to the shutting down of their nuclear facilities, and they are running a huge trade deficit because of it. 

Wind & solar power would require vast areas of open land, while Japan is but a tiny island already crowded with a lot of people. The furthest this can go is putting solar panels on rooftops, and hoping to break even and then profit after 10-15 years of use. 

Nuclear is a clear winner for energy efficiency, but the people of Japan would rather not repeat the nuclear disaster. I just hope the Japanese know that they will be sacrificing a lot of wealth for this security, and even then, nobody can run away from global warming and air pollution. 

I have recently decided to put more images in my posts because I figure that people are more attracted to pretty pictures than good text on Tumblr. So here you go, a pretty picture to go along with the real post.
Although Barclays is in the picture, I am not directly addressing that bank when I say that executives are overpaid and the rules of supply and demand don’t work for CEOs. 
I was reading the Economist recently and an article with a similar subject came into mind and struck up some memories of arguments with regards to other companies and their CEOs… 
If a large company like General Electric were to find itself in a position where it needs a new CEO, it would normally end up paying the new executive several millions of dollars for an annual salary. Why? Their argument is something like this…
"IF WE DON’T PAY THESE PEOPLE MILLIONS OF DOLLARS EVERY YEAR, THEY MIGHT WANT TO GO WORK FOR OTHER COMPANIES THAT WILL PAY MORE THAN US."
*laughing in the background*
Really huh? There is NOBODY in America who is well educated enough to run a company that is willing to work for less than 3 million dollars? I don’t think this is the truth and I honestly cannot believe that these executives are worth the money that they are paid considering how often we have seen major financial screw ups within the past decade.
It’s either greed or stupidity or both.

I have recently decided to put more images in my posts because I figure that people are more attracted to pretty pictures than good text on Tumblr. So here you go, a pretty picture to go along with the real post.

Although Barclays is in the picture, I am not directly addressing that bank when I say that executives are overpaid and the rules of supply and demand don’t work for CEOs. 

I was reading the Economist recently and an article with a similar subject came into mind and struck up some memories of arguments with regards to other companies and their CEOs… 

If a large company like General Electric were to find itself in a position where it needs a new CEO, it would normally end up paying the new executive several millions of dollars for an annual salary. Why? Their argument is something like this…

"IF WE DON’T PAY THESE PEOPLE MILLIONS OF DOLLARS EVERY YEAR, THEY MIGHT WANT TO GO WORK FOR OTHER COMPANIES THAT WILL PAY MORE THAN US."

*laughing in the background*

Really huh? There is NOBODY in America who is well educated enough to run a company that is willing to work for less than 3 million dollars? I don’t think this is the truth and I honestly cannot believe that these executives are worth the money that they are paid considering how often we have seen major financial screw ups within the past decade.

It’s either greed or stupidity or both.

Here is a picture of Obama sitting down on the Rosa Parks bus. Fun Stuff.
Now let me get to what I want to talk about: Waiting.
I love to wait for something because it seems to be the most productive period of my day. While I wait, I bust out my iPhone and read The Economist articles and learn about finance, economics, politics, and current events. It is the only time of day where I can comfortably know that I cannot possibly do anything else to occupy my time other than read about the news. 
It just feels special.

Here is a picture of Obama sitting down on the Rosa Parks bus. Fun Stuff.

Now let me get to what I want to talk about: Waiting.

I love to wait for something because it seems to be the most productive period of my day. While I wait, I bust out my iPhone and read The Economist articles and learn about finance, economics, politics, and current events. It is the only time of day where I can comfortably know that I cannot possibly do anything else to occupy my time other than read about the news. 

It just feels special.